NMSU’s Department of Industrial Engineering to offer three new undergraduate minors

The Department of Industrial Engineering will offer three new Undergraduate Minors beginning Fall 2022. Read below for descriptions, workforce needs and career opportunities in the new Undergraduate Minors. 

Undergraduate Minor in Systems Engineering

Department of Industrial Engineering

 

Program description

A minor in Systems Engineering offers an attractive complement to students’ current major. Today’s world runs on huge systems – communication systems, transportation systems, manufacturing systems, food-supply systems, etc. As these systems become more complex, there is an increasing need for systems engineering expertise and their roles becomes more important than ever. Systems engineers design, test and develop innovative and complex systems to solve real world problems, which often require inter-disciplinary and holistic approach. In addition to their domain knowledge, they need to have a big picture perspective of the entire life cycle of the systems, which often consist of several level of interacting subsystems. Upon completion of the program, students will be able to deal with complex systems at all phases of the systems’ life cycle in such a way that all associated functional, socio-economic and safety requirements are fulfilled.

 

Workforce needs and career opportunity

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics data, job growth for the systems engineers is very high, with an expected growth rate of 10%. Systems engineers are employed across the nearly 450 industry types as identified in the Standard Industrial Classification system. This minor provides students with a highly marketable knowledge base and skill set that is in high demand in today’s global economy and can also be virtually applied to any industry including Aerospace, Naval, Defense, Manufacturing, Service, Logistics, etc. This minor also offers a way to connect and reinforce the Graduate-level Systems Engineering Certificate that we currently offer through both online and in-person mode. 

 

 

Undergraduate Minor in Lean Manufacturing and Analytics

Department of Industrial Engineering

 

Program description

A minor in Lean Manufacturing is designed to provide students with a concentration in a broad perspective of methods to reduce waste, increase efficiency, meet customer satisfaction, and standardize processes in a safe working environment. Manufacturing opportunities are growing with changes in the global economy and career opportunities for students with an interest in lean manufacturing are extensive. This minor equips students with developing competencies in the implementation of lean tools, time studies, economic analysis, work safety, and data analytics for process improvement in any working environment such as industrial, government, agriculture, and services. This minor also familiarizes students with quality control techniques including statistical process control, six sigma, reliability, quality management and assurance.

 

Workforce needs and career opportunity

According to a report released by Lightweight Innovations For Tomorrow, job growth for the lean manufacturing engineers is high, with an expected growth rate of 8%. While job growth is expected to slow over the next decade, looming retirements and career changes mean that an estimated 23,800 job openings will exist through 2028 across the U.S. This minor equips students with a knowledge of manufacturing business practices such as planning, scheduling, resource allocation and inventory control, which can create new career options. This minor also offers a way to connect and reinforce the Professional Master in Advanced Manufacturing that our College of Engineering offers through both online and in-person mode. 

 

 

Undergraduate Minor in Supply Chain and Operations Research Analytics

Department of Industrial Engineering

 

Program description

A minor in the Supply Chain and Operations Research Analytics is designed to provide students with a concentration in a broad perspective of the supply chain combined with operations research and analytical skills. Digital technology including blockchain, Internet of Things, artificial intelligence, digital twins, and changing customer expectations push the supply chain profession to seek people who can pioneer advancements at the intersection of the supply chain and the operations research & analytics with soft skills. This minor helps students develop the knowledge and skills necessary for career options where analytics and decision-making are critical. Upon completion of the program, students will be able to interpret fundamental concepts in the supply chain management including operations and strategic cost management. They will also be able to develop and analyze simulation optimization models for organizational decision-making in the area of supply chains.      

 

Workforce needs and career opportunity

Job growth for Supply Chain and Operations Research Analysts is very high, with an expected growth rate of 26%. The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics data projects a growing need for Supply Chain and Operations Research, and analytic professionals to improve business planning and decision-making, anticipating demand for over 31,000 new jobs in this field over the next 10 years. Furthermore, as the healthcare industry explodes in growth, it is projected that the Supply Chain and Operations Research Analysts in the ambulatory healthcare field can expect 49% growth over the next 10 years. This minor provides students with a highly marketable knowledge base and skill set that is in high demand during today’s global economy and can also be virtually applied to any industry including Aerospace, Naval, Defense, Manufacturing, healthcare, Service, Logistics, etc. This minor also offers a way to connect and reinforce the Master’s degree programs (i.e., MSIE and MEIE) that we currently offer through both online and in-person mode.


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